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Derby Arboretum

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Posted by bogdan · Posted on 07/31/2013 · Updated on 06/04/2017

One of the attractions of Derby is its arboretum. This is the first UK publicly accessible urban landscape park. It is located in the Rose Hill area, about a mile from the city center. Recently, a grant from the National Lottery was spent on the reconstruction of the park, since it is included in the Register of Parks and Gardens of Special Historic Interest in England.

The arboretum was presented to the city back in 1840 by the former measure of the city, Joseph Stratt, in gratitude to the residents of the city for their support. The layout of the park was done by John Lowden. It is believed that the layout of the arboretum served as a prototype for the device of the Central Park of New York. Initially, a visit to the park was paid (except for the environment, which was a shortened working day in the factories of the city), but in 1882 the fee was canceled. Since then, the park has been enriched with many interesting structures, statues and decorations.

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On the territory of the arboretum for some time (since 1890) there were several enclosures that contained unusual birds, but due to insufficient funding, they were eliminated by 1970.

During the Second World War, the arboretum performed completely unusual functions. He was involved in the activities of the Dig For Victory public movement to provide food to the population, and instead of flowers, carrots and Brussels sprouts were planted in the arboretum, and arboretum gardeners organized special courses at which citizens were taught how to grow tomatoes themselves.

Probably the most famous park sculpture is the Florentine boar statue, placed here back in 1806 at the initiative of J. Startt. He turned to sculptor William John Coffee with an order to sculpt a clay copy of the Florentine bronze statue that he saw in the center of Florence. The boar remained in its original form until it was damaged during the Second World War as a result of air raids. A modern bronze statue was installed in 2005.

After a comprehensive reconstruction of the park, playgrounds for children of different ages have been equipped on its territory, and tennis courts and other sports grounds for older visitors. The park is home to almost tame squirrels and many species of birds. A special decoration of this green zone of the city is a decorative pond.

Photo and description

The Derby Arboretum is Britain's first public, planned city park designed for recreation. The arboretum was donated to the city by local industrialist Joseph Stratt, the former mayor of Derby. Thus, Stratt wanted to express his gratitude to the people of Derby. By this time, the rapidly growing and developing city was in great need of a place for rest and walks. The park was designed by John Loudon. At first, entrance to the park was paid, with the exception of Sundays and Wednesdays - the environment at the Derby factories was a short day. In 1882, the entrance fee to the park was canceled.

It is believed that the Derby Arboretum was taken as a model when planning Central Park in New York.

In recent years, the park has fallen into disrepair due to lack of funds and due attention from the city authorities, but recently the situation has changed for the better. Financing problems were resolved, buildings in the park were repaired, surveillance cameras were installed to ensure security. The park has sports fields and tennis courts. There are playgrounds for children of different ages - a pirate ship, a swing and a sandbox for the smallest, and sports equipment for teenagers.

Squirrels live in the park, who are almost not afraid of people and willingly beg for goodies from visitors. The most different types of birds were chosen by bushes and a park pond.

The statue of the Florentine hog is very popular - a bronze copy of the sculpture installed in Florence.

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