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Millstatt Monastery

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Lake Millstattersee is amazing in its nature and beauty. The width of the lake is 1.5 km, and the length reaches 12 km. Water warms up in the summer to +26. Pristine forests surround the lake, the mountains are beautifully reflected in its waters, historical traditions and the richness of nature make it possible for a variety of active and cultural recreation.

Thanks to the magnificent mountain scenery and crystal clear waters, the lake attracts many tourists who come to relax and enjoy beautiful views and fresh mountain air. On the Millstattersee lake are the resorts of Millstatt, Döbriach and Seeboden and cozy small towns with beautiful architecture, the rest of which will be unforgettable and fabulous for everyone who comes here to spend their holidays.

Cultural life is multifaceted, tourists can visit the Puppet Museum in Treffen, the Folk Art Museum “Renaissance Schloss Porcia”, the Porsche Museum in Gmünde, visit the performance at the Porzia Castle, the Spittal Comedy Theater, the international music festival in Millstadt and taste the gastronomic delights. Also, those who wish can play golf, beach volleyball, go in for water sports, swim, take a walk in the National Park, make a cruise on the lake, go fishing. Zander, eel and lake trout are found in the lake.

Holidays in this amazing - wonderful place you will remember for a long time! This is a true paradise for cultural and family vacations, a pleasure without limits.

Photo and description

Millstatt Monastery is a former monastery located in Millstatt am See in the federal state of Carinthia. It was founded in 1070 and for centuries has been the spiritual and cultural center of Carinthia.

Millstatt was founded by the brothers Aribo II and Potto from the Bavarian Aribonid family. The abbey flourished under the auspices of Pope Calixtus II, and in 1245, the rector Milstatt even received the right to sew papal vestments from the Archbishop of Salzburg. The most striking period in the development of the monastery fell on the abbot Otto III. At that time, many valuable manuscripts were written, countless funds made impressive donations to the monastery.

In 1274, Millstatt was destroyed by fire, the abbot Otto IV was engaged in restoration, work was carried out until 1291.

Under Emperor Frederick, the monastery fell into decay: morality degenerated, buildings gradually decayed, and abbots were incompetent. It was necessary to cope with the huge debts of the monastery and put in order the abandoned buildings. In addition, Millstatt was severely devastated by the Turks in 1478, and later by the Hungarian forces in 1487. The management of the monastery passed to Maximilian I, however, the situation was difficult, control was partially lost. Peasant revolts and the spread of the Protestant faith took place in Millstatt.

In 1598, under Archduke Ferdinand II, the Jesuits established a college in the capital of Styria (the modern University of Graz), which was to finance Millstatt at the expense of its income. The monks did not like the harsh measures and pressure of the Jesuits. In 1737, discontent grew into an open riot, when many peasants took up arms and broke into the monastery. In 1773, the monks were forced to leave Millstatt, and all possessions were transferred to state administration.

The most interesting part of the monastery is the courtyard with two-story Renaissance arches, built in the 16th century. The monastery is connected to the church by a covered gallery of the 12th century, decorated with columns with images of animals, plants and people. The Romanesque portal inside the church was created in 1170 by master Rudger. In the side chapels of the church are the tombstones of the Masters of the Order of St. George, who once belonged to the monastery.

Since 1977, the church has been owned by the local parish, and all other buildings of the former monastery belong to the Austrian State Forestry Commission.

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